Flowering Gum

Australian Native Flowers | 30 of The Best Australian Native Flowering Plants

Flowering plants are probably the most popular types of plants to care for because of the beauty and splash of colour they bring to the surroundings. Fortunately, Australia is never in short of selections of bright and vibrant flora, especially Australian native flowers. Having native plants, as opposed to non-natives, is more advantageous and better for the environment, as well as saving more time and effort because most of them require less maintenance.

30 of The Best Australian Native Flowering Plants

  1. Grevillea robusta or Silky Oak
  1. Banksia ericifolia x spinulosa or Banksia Giant Candles
  1. Callistemon viminalis or Callistemon Little John Bottlebrush
  1. Boronia heterophylla or Boronia Lipstick
  1. Grevillea ‘Winter Delight’
  1. Correa Pulchella ‘Remarkable Rocks’or Native Fuchsia
  1. Stylidium graminifolium ‘Little Sapphire’ or Trigger Grass
  1. Crowea exalta dwarf low dome  or Small Crowea, Low Crowea, Dwarf Crowea
  1. Eutaxia obovate or Bacon and Egg Plant
  1. Crowea Saligna  or Willow Leaf Crowea
  1. Grevillea ‘Fireworks’
  1. Correa alba
  1. Ficinia nodosa or Knobby Club Rush
  1. Ozothamnus diosmifolius or White Rice Flower 
  1. Pimelea ferruginea or Pink Rice Flower
  1. Corymbia ficifolia or Eucalyptus Mini Red
  1. Leptospermum scoparium or Manuka
  1. Prostanthera sieberi or Prostanthera Minty
  1. Corymbia ficifolia or Flowering Gum
  1. Xerochrysum bracteatum or Golden Everlasting
  1. Chrysocephalum apiculatum or Yellow Buttons
  1. Correa glabra x decumbens or Correa Tucker Time Dinner Bells
  1. Callistemon Injune
  1. Banksia ericifolia or Banksia Red Rover
  1. Alyogyne huegelii or West Coast Gem
  1. Grevillea Hills Jubilee
  1. Hardenbergia violacea or Hardenbergia Happy Wanderer
  1. Leptospermum scoparium or Leptospermum Wiri Susan, Manuka and Tea Tree
  1. Gossypium sturtianum or Sturt’s Desert Rose
  1. Acacia pycnantha or Golden Wattle

The following is an in-depth list of 30 of the best Australian native flowers that you can add to your garden.

Grevillea robusta or Silky Oak

The Silky Oak is probably one of the most popular Australian native flowering trees. In spring and summer, it displays a stunning bloom of golden flowers which makes it a popular ornamental tree. Even though it can grow up to 25 metres, and sometimes even up to 40 metres, the grevillea robusta could also be an indoor plant with proper care.

  • Position – 2 to 3 weeks in the shade after transplanting; can be planted to permanent positions after 6 to 8 months
  • Soil – Well-drained, rich, moist; do not plant in heavy clays and limey soils
  • Watering – Water regularly until established, then water occasionally
  • Pruning – Prune after flowering; can be pruned heavily and repeat as needed 
  • Feeding – Feed when buds form, with slow-release native fertiliser
  • Ideal Climate – Warm temperate to tropical
Grevillea Robusta
Grevillea Robusta

Banksia ericifolia x spinulosa or Banksia Giant Candles

The Banksia giant candles got its name from its huge orange-bronze flower spikes that can grow up to 40 cm long, and bloom in autumn and winter. This Australian native is a large shrub that can be used as a hedge for its dense foliage.

  • Position – Full sun for more flowers, light shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; sandy, sandy loam, loamy, clay loam, saline, poor soil
  • Watering – Low, drought-resistant
  • Pruning – Prune to shape for formal uses
  • Feeding – Low phosphorous, slow-release native fertiliser in spring
  • Ideal Climate – Sub-tropical, warm temperate, cool temperate, Mediterranean, cool, mild tropical, semi-arid, arid
Banksia Giant Candles
Banksia Giant Candles

Callistemon viminalis or Callistemon Little John Bottlebrush

The Little John Bottlebrush is an Australian native flower that is considered as a true dwarf variety. It is truly compact and grows to only around 75 cm tall and wide, and its blue-green foliage is a stark backdrop against its dark red flowers.

  • Position – Full sun, light shade
  • Soil – Well-drained, sandy, sandy loam, loamy, clay, clay loam, poor soil
  • Watering – Water regularly until established
  • Pruning – To encourage dense growth, prune tips while young
  • Feeding – Feed twice a year with a slow-release fertiliser in spring and autumn
  • Ideal Climate – Sub-tropical, cool, cool temperate, warm temperate, Mediterranean
Little John Bottlebrush
Little John Bottlebrush

Boronia heterophylla or Boronia Lipstick

The Boronia lipstick has an aromatic foliage that adds a pleasant fragrance to the surroundings. In winter and spring, stunning purple-pink bell-shaped flowers bloom, making this colourful shrub a great complement to borders and mixed garden beds.

  • Position – Full sun, light shade
  • Soil – Well-drained, rich soil
  • Watering – Water regularly during dry periods; requires little Water once established
  • Pruning – Keep it compact by light pruning after flowering
  • Feeding – Do not fertilise right after planting; a small amount of slow-release, native fertiliser for maintenance and to support growth
  • Ideal Climate – Arid, semi-arid, cool temperate, mild tropical
Boronia Heterophylla
Boronia Heterophylla

Grevillea ‘Winter Delight’

This grevillea hybrid is a low growing shrub with soft grey foliage that produces clusters of flowers which grow in winter, which makes the burst of red and cream blooms truly a delight during the season. The winter delight also makes for beautiful displays on decks when put in containers.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil – Dry, well-drained; sandy loam, loamy, clay loam, potting mix
  • Watering – Water deeply for the first 6 to 8 weeks until established; requires little Water once established
  • Pruning – Lightly prune in warmer months to maintain size and shape
  • Feeding — Slow-release, native fertiliser
  • Ideal Climate – Cool, cool temperate, warm temperate, Mediterranean, arid, semi-arid, sub-tropical
Grevillea Winter Delight
Grevillea Winter Delight

Correa Pulchella ‘Remarkable Rocks’ or Native Fuchsia

The native fuchsia is another Australian native flower that blooms in the wither. Its salmon coloured blooms attract nectar-feeding birds.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil – Moist; Sandy, sandy loam, loamy, clay loam, poor soil
  • Watering — Water deeply until established; requires little Water once established
  • Pruning – Tip pruning in late spring, after the flowering period to encourage development
  • Feeding — Slow-release, native fertiliser in early autumn and spring
  • Ideal Climate – Cool temperate, warm temperate, arid, semi-arid, mild tropical, Mediterranean
Correa Pulchella
Correa Pulchella – BotBln

Stylidium graminifolium ‘Little Sapphire’ or Trigger Grass

This dwarf tufting Australian native flowering plant produces deep pink flowers held above its blue foliage. It is called a trigger plant or trigger grass because of how its flowers are “triggered” and spring upwards when an insect lands on it, dumping its pollen on the insect’s head so that the plant can disperse its pollen through that.

  • Position – Full sun, light shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; sandy loam, loamy, clay loam, potting mix
  • Watering – Moderate Water during active growth; dormant in dry periods
  • Pruning – Remove dead leaves and flowers
  • Feeding — Slow-release, native fertiliser
  • Ideal Climate – Cool temperate, warm temperate, sub-tropical, tropical, semi-arid, arid, Mediterranean
Stylidium Graminifolium
Stylidium Graminifolium

Crowea exalata dwarf low dome  or Small Crowea, Low Crowea, Dwarf Crowea

This compact crowea is a great Australian native flower for pots, garden beds and rockeries. In late winter, its pink star-shaped blooms appear, perfectly complementing its dark green leaves.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; sandy, sandy loam, loamy, clay loam, potting mix
  • Watering – Water regularly until established
  • Pruning – Prune in late winter or after active flowering to encourage bushy growth and to avoid the development of bare stems
  • Feeding – Just a little liquid fertiliser monthly
  • Ideal Climate – Cool temperate, warm temperate, arid, semi-arid, sub-tropical, mild tropical, tropical, Mediterranean
Crowea Exalata Dwarf Low Dome
Crowea Exalata Dwarf Low Dome

Eutaxia obovate or Bacon and Egg Plant

Some people see the Bacon and Egg Plant as a fun and bright, while others appreciate its gentle beauty. Regardless of the perception, they all agree that this Australian native flower is an interesting addition to the garden, showing off in spring its bright yellow pea-shaped flowers with a touch of brown in the middle.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; sandy loam, loamy, clay loam
  • Watering – Water regularly until established
  • Pruning – Lightly prune after flowering to maintain a more bushy and compact habit
  • Feeding – Slow-release, long-term in spring
  • Ideal Climate – Warm temperate, semi-arid, cool temperate, Mediterranean
Eutaxia Obovate
Eutaxia Obovate

Crowea Saligna  or Willow Leaf Crowea

The waxy, star-shaped pink flowers of the willow leaf crowea is another bright addition to the garden. In addition to its lovely display of flower and foliage, this small shrub also attracts bees and butterflies.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; sandy, sandy loam, loamy, clay loam
  • Watering – Requires little Water once established
  • Pruning – Prune after flowering to encourage a bushy habit
  • Feeding – Slow-release, native fertiliser in spring
  • Ideal Climate – Cool temperate, warm temperate, semi-arid, arid, mild tropical
Crowea Saligna
Crowea Saligna

Grevillea ‘Fireworks’

Grevillea ‘Fireworks’ is truly a remarkable, especially in autumn when its bright red and yellow flower appear in the form resembling fireworks displays. Even without its flowers, this plant’s blue-green foliage is also just as attractive.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; sandy, sandy loam, loamy, clay loam, potting mix
  • Watering – Requires little Water once established
  • Pruning – Light pruning to encourage more dense growth
  • Feeding — Slow-release, native fertiliser in early spring or late summer
  • Ideal Climate – Cool temperate, warm temperate, semi-arid, arid, cool, mild tropical, sub-tropical, Mediterranean
Grevillea Fireworks
Grevillea Fireworks

Correa alba

The greyish-green oval leaves of this small shrub is a perfect backdrop for its white star-shaped flowers that bloom in autumn and winter. Its nectar-rich flowers attract many birds to the garden.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; sandy, sandy loam, loamy, clay loam, potting mix
  • Watering – Requires little Water once established
  • Pruning – Prune after flowering; can be shaped for formal uses
  • Feeding – A small amount of slow-release, native fertiliser once a year in spring
  • Ideal Climate – Cool temperate, warm temperate, arid, semi-arid, Mediterranean
Correa Alba
Correa Alba

Ficinia nodosa or Knobby Club Rush

The knobby club rush is another Australian native flower that blooms in the winter when it grows spiky dried flower heads. This is a hardy and versatile addition to the garden, whether it is planted in dry or wet soil.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil – all soil types, especially in coastal areas
  • Watering – Requires little Water once established; Water up to twice a week if the weather is too hot and dry
  • Pruning – Prune back to ground level when it loses its shape or form, or if overgrown
  • Feeding – Fertilise with slow-release native fertiliser after pruning
  • Ideal Climate – Cool temperate, mild tropical, tropical, arid, semi-arid
Knobby Club Rush
Knobby Club Rush

Ozothamnus diosmifolius or White Rice Flower 

This is another compact Australian native flowering bush with aromatic leaves. The rice flower blooms all year round, giving the garden the burst of clusters of white flowers, making it an ideal and attractive low hedge.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; sandy loam, loamy, clay loam, poor soil, potting mix
  • Watering – Medium water needs; Water well after fertilising
  • Pruning – Lightly prune or deadhead after flowering to promote new flowering
  • Feeding – Slow release, native fertiliser in warmer months
  • Ideal Climate – Cool, warm temperate, cool temperate, sub-tropical, Mediterranean
Ozothamnus Diosmifolius
Ozothamnus Diosmifolius

Pimelea ferruginea or Pink Rice Flower

Like the white rice flower, the pimelea ferruginea also blooms clusters of flowers ideal for cutting. The pink rice flower splashes its colour in various shades of pink in early spring through summer.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; Sandy loam, loamy, potting mix
  • Watering – Medium water needs
  • Pruning – Lightly prune or deadhead after flowering to promote new flowering
  • Feeding — A small amount of slow-release, native fertiliser once a year
  • Ideal Climate – Mild tropical, arid, semi-arid, cool temperate, warm temperate, Mediterranean
Pimelea Ferruginea
Pimelea Ferruginea

Corymbia ficifolia or Eucalyptus Mini Red

The eucalyptus mini red has all the characteristics of a full-sized c. ficifolia, but in a smaller and more compact tree. Its foliage has a weeping habit, and from December to March, its fiery red flowers attract birds.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained
  • Watering – Requires little Water once established
  • Pruning – Prune after flowering
  • Feeding – Slow release, native fertiliser
  • Ideal Climate – Mild tropical, cool temperate, semi-arid, arid
Eucalyptus Mini Red
Eucalyptus Mini Red

Leptospermum scoparium or Manuka

Manuka trees are very hardy. This Australian and New Zealand native shrub has needle-like leaves and striking flowers in shades of red, pink or white that are attractive to bees. The brewed foliage is also a good source of vitamin C.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; loam, chalk, sand
  • Watering – Water 2 to 3 times per week until established’ requires little Water once established
  • Pruning – Minimal pruning after flowering to maintain shape and encourage more flowers
  • Feeding – Feed while growing in spring; established trees could be fertilised every 2 or 3 years 
  • Ideal Climate – Arid, semi-arid, cool temperate, mild tropical
Leptospermum Scoparium
Leptospermum Scoparium

Prostanthera sieberi or Prostanthera Minty

The mint bush is a highly aromatic dense shrub. In spring and summer, its pretty violet flowers overtake the whole shrub, attracting small birds and butterflies to the garden. 

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; sandy, sandy loam, loamy, clay loam, potting mix
  • Watering – Requires little Water once established
  • Pruning – Prune for formal uses after flowering
  • Feeding – Use native fertiliser and Water immediately to avoid root or leaf burn
  • Ideal Climate – Cool temperate, warm temperate, arid, semi-arid, mild tropical, Mediterranean
Prostanthera Minty
Prostanthera Minty

Corymbia ficifolia or Flowering Gum

The flowering gum is a good choice for a spectacular display of Australian native flowers. There is a whole range of colours to choose from—bright red, soft pink, whites, or orange—with some flowers coming in two colours each, depending on the variety.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; sandy, sandy loam, loamy, clay loam
  • Watering – Requires little Water once established
  • Pruning – Deadhead; mature trees do not need pruning; fruit capsules may also be removed
  • Feeding – Native fertiliser in early spring
  • Ideal Climate – Cool temperate, warm temperate, cool, Mediterranean
Flowering Gum
Flowering Gum

Xerochrysum bracteatum or Golden Everlasting

The golden everlasting could be annual or perennial and has flowers with papery petals with bright yellow in the middle. This Australian native flower also comes in a variety of colours, and when planted together brings a wide array of colours to the flower bed or garden.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; sandy, sandy loam, loamy, clay loam, potting mix
  • Watering – Requires little Water once established
  • Pruning – Light pruning annually; “legginess” may be remedied by severe pruning (use with caution)
  • Feeding – Slow-release native fertiliser annually
  • Ideal Climate – Mild tropical, arid, semi-arid, cool temperate
Golden Everlasting
Golden Everlasting

Chrysocephalum apiculatum or Yellow Buttons

Yellow buttons are attractive groundcover. Its flowers, round and yellow, bloom from long stems and look like bright little buttons against the narrow silver foliage. This is also considered as a fire retardant. 

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; sandy loam, loamy, clay loam, potting mix, poor soil, saline
  • Watering – Requires little Water once established
  • Pruning – Prune heavily to encourage denser growth
  • Feeding – Slow-release native fertiliser
  • Ideal Climate – Cool temperate, warm temperate, arid, semi-arid, Mediterranean
Yellow Buttons
Yellow Buttons

Correa glabra x decumbens or Correa Tucker Time Dinner Bells

The Correa Tucker Time Dinner Bells is a hybrid that produces red and yellow flowers with cream tip in November to August. These nectar-rich blooms attract many birds.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; sandy, sandy loam, loamy, clay loam, potting mix
  • Watering – Requires little Water once established
  • Pruning – Light pruning to maintain shape
  • Feeding – Slow-release native fertiliser
  • Ideal Climate – Cool temperate, warm temperate, arid, semi-arid, Mediterranean, cool
Correa Tucker Time Dinner Bells
Correa Tucker Time Dinner Bells

Callistemon Injune

The Callistemon injune is also a hybrid. This Australian native flower produces bottlebrush flowers in soft pink, adding a dainty touch of colour from spring to summer.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil — Well-drained; sandy, sandy loam, loamy, clay loam, potting mix
  • Watering – Requires little Water once established; wait to dry before watering; do not overwater
  • Pruning – Light pruning to encourage growth
  • Feeding – Slow-release native fertiliser in spring and autumn after flowering
  • Ideal Climate – Arid, semi-arid, cool temperate
Callistemon Injune
Callistemon Injune

Banksia ericifolia or Banksia Red Rover

The Banksia Red Rover produces long-lasting candle-like flowers that come in bronze to red. Its foliage is lime green and tightly knit and has an open growing habit.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; sandy, sandy loam, loamy, clay loam
  • Watering – Requires little Water once established
  • Pruning – Light pruning to maintain and encourage growth
  • Feeding – Slow-release native fertiliser once a year
  • Ideal Climate – Cool temperate, mild tropical, arid, semi-arid
Banksia Red Rover
Banksia Red Rover

Alyogyne huegelii or West Coast Gem

The Native Hibiscus is another Australian native flower that comes in a variety of colours—yellow, pink, purple, red, white—with some even coming in a combination of gradients. The West coast gem, in particular, produces flowers in shades of purple from spring to autumn.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil — Well-drained; sandy loam, loamy, clay loam
  • Watering — Requires little Water once established; wait to dry before watering; do not overwater
  • Pruning – Prune after spring bloom to encourage flowering
  • Feeding – Slow-release native fertiliser in spring
  • Ideal Climate – Cool temperate, warm temperate, arid, semi-arid, sub-tropical, mild tropical, Mediterranean
Alyogyne Huegelii
Alyogyne Huegelii

Grevillea Hills Jubilee

This grevillea hybrid produces spider-like flowers that come in white and pink. Hills Jubilee is also attractive to birds.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil — Well-drained; sandy loam, loamy, clay loam
  • Watering — Requires little Water once established; wait to dry before watering; do not overwater
  • Pruning – Prune after flowering to encourage dense growth and maintain a compact growth habit
  • Feeding – Slow-release native fertiliser; more frequent fertilising may be needed in warmer climates
  • Ideal Climate – Cool temperate, semi-arid, arid, mild tropical, tropical
Grevillea Hills Jubilee
Grevillea Hills Jubilee

Hardenbergia violacea or Hardenbergia Happy Wanderer

The Happy Wanderer probably got its name for its vigorous climbing habit, making it an ideal plant for covering fences and trellises, or as a gorgeous groundcover. Its glossy green leaves are a nice contrast to the violet mauve flowers that bloom in winter to early spring.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil — Well-drained; sandy, sandy loam, loamy, clay loam
  • Watering – Water regularly but allow the soil to dry in between
  • Pruning – Severe pruning in April after flowering to control spread and reinvigorate older plants
  • Feeding – Slow-release native fertiliser in spring or late summer
  • Ideal Climate – Cool temperate, semi-arid, arid, mild tropical
Hardenbergia Happy Wanderer
Hardenbergia Happy Wanderer

Tea Tree

In spring, this Australian native flower makes an attractive showpiece, whether in the garden or a pot. Its large white flowers attract birds and insects, and the dense foliage makes a good screen or hedge.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil — Well-drained; sandy loam, loamy, clay loam
  • Watering — Requires little Water once established; Water thoroughly during dry periods
  • Pruning – Prune after flowering to encourage dense growth and maintain a compact growth habit
  • Feeding – Slow-release native fertiliser
  • Ideal Climate – Cool temperate, semi-arid, arid, mild tropical,
Tea Tree
Tea Tree

Gossypium sturtianum or Sturt’s Desert Rose

This large woody shrub produces lilac to mauve, hibiscus-like blooms in winter and practically all year. Birds and insects also love this Australian native flower.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil — Well-drained; sandy, sandy loam, loamy, clay loam, poor soil
  • Watering — Requires little Water once established; Water thoroughly during dry periods
  • Pruning – Prune after flowering to encourage dense growth and maintain a compact growth habit
  • Feeding – Slow-release native fertiliser
  • Ideal Climate – Cool temperate, semi-arid, arid, mild tropical
Sturt’s Desert Rose
Sturt’s Desert Rose

Acacia pycnantha or Golden Wattle

This list will not be complete without Australia’s floral emblem, the Golden Wattle. From a young age, it produces clusters of bright yellow balls of flowers, giving the gardens a burst of sunshine from early September, coinciding around the same time as the National Wattle Day on September 1st. The petals are numerous but tiny and almost hidden by its long stamens, giving it a fluffy light appearance.

  • Position – Hot sunny summers for maximum flowering
  • Soil – Well-drained; dry and moist; sandy, stony, loam, clay loam, poor soil, potting mix; acid and neutral soils
  • Watering – Little to no water once established
  • Pruning – May need pruning during dry months; only trim dead growth
  • Feeding – Orchid fertiliser on the first year of growth, every 3 to 4 weeks; when established, feed once a year with slow-release native fertiliser
  • Ideal Climate – Cool temperate, warm temperate, Mediterranean
Golden Wattle
Golden Wattle

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