Australian Native Plants | 30 Of The Best Australian Native Plants For Your Garden [Photos With Plant Care Sheets]

Australia is home to a truly diverse selection of flora. There is a wide variety of plants to choose from, most especially when it comes to the best Australian native plants for their garden. More and more gardeners are now opting to put Australian native plants because of their benefits to the environment.

Australian Native Plants in a Garden

Planting natives instead of foreign species will help support a healthier environment by improving biodiversity, as well as providing the appropriate food and shelter for native animals. In addition to the environmental benefits, there could also be practical personal benefits to planting natives such as saving time and money, because a lot of them are relatively low maintenance.

30 of the best Australian native plants that could be perfect for your garden

  1. Acacia cognata or Acacia Lime Magik (Magic)
  2. Austrostipa stipoides or Coastal Spear Grass
  3. Banksia serrata or Old Man Banksia
  4. Pycnosorus globosus or Billy Button
  5. Asplenium australasicum or Bird’s Nest Fern
  6. Myoporum parvifolium or Creeping Boobialla
  7. Correa reflexa x C. backhousiana or Correa Mini Marion (Marian)
  8. Macrozamia or Cycads
  9. Platycerium superbum or Staghorn Fern
  10. Eremophila glabra or Tar Bush
  11. Licuala ramsayi or Fan Palm
  12. Citrus australasica or Finger Lime
  13. Gastrolobium brachysema or Brown Butterfly
  14. Xanthorrhoea australis or Grass Tree
  15. Grevillea Carpet Layer
  16. Eucalyptus or Gum Tree
  17. Doryanthes escelsia or Gymea Lily
  18. Hardenbergia violacea or Heardenbergia Sweetheart
  19. Brachychiton acerifolius or Illawarra Flame Tree, Flame Bottle Tree, Flame Kurrajong
  20. Themeda australis or Kangaroo Grass
  21. Anigozanthos x hybrid or Kangaroo Paw ‘Bush Gold’
  22. Leptospermum Aphrodite or Tea Tree
  23. Syzygium smithii  or Lilly Pilly
  24. Lomandra longifolia or Mat-rush
  25. Philotheca myoporoides or Long-leaf Waxflower
  26. Rhagodia spinescens or Creeping Salt Bush, Spiny Salt Bush
  27. Scaevola aemula or Fairy Fan Flower
  28. Eremophila maculata or Spotted Emu Bush, Spotted Fuchsia Bush
  29. Poa labillardierei or Common Tussock Grass
  30. Schefflera actinophylla or Umbrella Tree

  1. Acacia cognata or Acacia Lime Magik (Magic)

The Acacia Lime Magic is considered as either a shrub or a small tree with a lime green pendulous foliage. The lime magik can grow as high as 10 metres tall and about 2 to 3 metres wide. Its seemingly gracefully cascading leaves and gorgeous yellow flowers look stunning against the winter and spring backdrop. 

  • Position – Full sun to part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; clay, loam, sandy loam, clay loam
  • Watering – Water while actively growing; water during dry periods; mature plants tolerate drought
  • Pruning – low maintenance; deadhead; prune to shape
  • Feeding – Low phosphorous native fertiliser

Acacia Cognata Close up

 

Acacia Cognata – Batsv

  1. Austrostipa stipoides or Coastal Spear Grass

The Coastal spear grass, as named, is native to the coasts of New Zealand and South-eastern Australia. This tufted perennial is suitable for borders and driveways, and as an infill plant. At first, one may not consider a humble grass as one of the best Australian native plants, but take note that they contribute to the coastal environment as a habitat for birds and insects, in addition to the benefits of it being low maintenance. 

  • Position — Full sun
  • Soil — Well-drained; sandy; will also grow in poor soil
  • Watering — Very little water needed
  • Pruning — Prune as desired to limit its height
  • Feeding – No need
  • Climate Zone – Warm, arid, semi-arid

Austrostipa Stipoides Close up

 

Austrostipa Stipoides – Krzysztof Ziarnek, Kenraiz

  1. Banksia serrata or Old Man Banksia

Banksia Serrata is a small tree that could also be ideal for pots and containers. It will tolerate a wide range of climate and soils, which is why it is also a good choice for natives. Its foliage is green and serrated, with silver backing. From summer through winter, it displays its unusually shaped tubular flowers. 

  • Position – Full sun to part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; clay-based
  • Watering – Water while actively growing; water during dry periods; mature plants tolerate drought
  • Pruning – low maintenance; deadhead; prune to shape; take care not to cut old wood
  • Feeding – Not necessary; Phosphorous-free native fertiliser
  • Climate Zone – Cool, Temperate, Arid, Semi-arid, Mild Tropical

Old Man Banksia Close up

 

Old Man Banksia

  1. Pycnosorus globosus or Billy Button

This Australian native plant is a popular cut flower because of its striking bright yellow flowers that grow from long stems. The billy button can become as tall as 50 cm. It is also very popular as a dried flower. 

  • Position – Full sun to part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; clay, loam, sandy loam, clay loam, potting mix
  • Watering – Water while actively growing; water during dry periods; mature plants tolerate drought
  • Pruning – low maintenance; deadhead
  • Feeding – Low phosphorous native fertiliser
  • Climate – Cool, Temperate, Arid, Semi-arid

Billy Button Close Up

 

Billy Button

  1. Asplenium australasicum or Bird’s Nest Fern

What’s better than having pretty plants in the garden, is having pretty plants that can also be eaten. The bird’s nest fern’s leathery foliage is a popular vegetable for some Taiwanese. Upon maturity, the fronds of this fern could grow to as long as 2 metres.

  • Position – Full sun to part shade; indoors
  • Soil – Well-drained; moist
  • Watering – Water well after planting for several weeks until established, then water deeply once a week, and twice depending on the weather.
  • Pruning – Deadhead from base
  • Feeding – Slow-release, low phosphorous native fertiliser in spring and autumn
  • Climate Zone — Arid, Semi-arid, Mild Tropical, Tropical

Bird’s Nest Fern Close Up

 

Bird’s Nest Fern

  1. Myoporum parvifolium or Creeping Boobialla

The creeping boobialla is a hardy weed-suppressing ground cover with fleshy green foliage. It blooms dainty white flowers in summer and is ideal for places that are hard to landscape. Another notable advantage of the myoporum parvifolium that makes it one of the best Australian native plants is because it is a fire-retardant plant, according to SA Country Fire Service.

  • Position – Full sun to part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; clay, loam, sand
  • Watering – Water well after planting for several weeks until established; requires little water once established
  • Pruning – Prune in late winter or early spring; deadhead to encourage more blooms
  • Feeding – Slow-release, low phosphorous native fertiliser in spring and autumn
  • Climate Zone – Warm, Temperate, Cool temperate, Mediterranean

Myoporum Parvifolium Close Up

 

Myoporum Parvifolium – cultivar413

  1. Correa reflexa x C. backhousiana or Correa Mini Marion (Marian)

The Correa Mini Marrion is named as such because it is a dwarf form of the Marion’s Marvel. Its green and pink or green and red tubular flowers bloom from March to September, are long-lasting, and attracts many birds. 

  • Position – Full sun to part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; dry or moist
  • Watering – Water well after planting for several weeks until established; requires little water once established
  • Pruning – Prune after flowering if needed
  • Feeding – Slow-release, low phosphorous native fertiliser once established
  • Climate Zone – Warm temperate,Temperate, Cool temperate

Correa Mini Mario Close Up

 

Correa Mini Mario – Seeds of South Australia

  1. Macrozamia or Cycads

Cycads may resemble palms or ferns, but they are actually related to conifers—the macrozamia bear seeds in their cones. They grow as either male or female, with the females producing a much larger seed cone. Its seeds are food for the marsupials, fruit bats, and large birds.

  • Position – Full sun for larger plants; part shade for smaller ones
  • Soil – Well-drained; sandy, not chalky soil
  • Watering – Water well until established
  • Pruning – Prune dead leaves in spring; prune insect-infested leaves; prune shed and dried cones
  • Feeding – Slow-release, low phosphorous native fertiliser
  • Climate Zone – Warm, Temperate, Cool temperate, Mediterranean

Macrozamia Close Up

 

Macrozamia

  1. Platycerium superbum or Staghorn Fern

This Queensland rainforest and Northern New South Wales native is one of the popular ones in the cultivation of Platycerium. Some may find the foliage a bit off-putting for looking dishevelled or tangled antlers, but for some, it adds an interesting addition to the greenery,

  • Position – Light shade, occasional sun
  • Soil – Can absorb nutrients from the air;Minimal root system that can grow attached to a piece of wood or tree trunk.
  • Watering – Regular watering
  • Pruning – Prune damaged fertile fronds; leave shield leaves untouched even if damaged
  • Feeding – Well balanced, diluted liquid fertiliser in spring and summer; reduce fertilising in autumn and winter months
  • Climate Zone – Warm, Temperate, Cool temperate, Mediterranean, Arid, Semi-arid, Mild Tropical, Tropical

Staghorn Fern Close Up

 

Staghorn Fern

  1. Eremophila glabra or Tar Bush

The tar bush is beautiful as ground cover or even in a large container. Its bright tubular flowers contrast the silvery foliage, great for garden beds and for attracting birds.

  • Position – Full sun, part shade
  • Soil – Sandy, Sandy loam, Clay loam, Poor soil
  • Watering – Require little water once established
  • Pruning – Low maintenance once established; don’t prune hard every year, tip pruning is enough
  • Feeding – Low phosphorous native fertiliser
  • Climate Zone – Cool, Temperate, Arid, Semi-arid, Mild Tropical, Tropical

Eremophila Glabra Close Up

 

Eremophila Glabra – Geoff Derrin

  1. Licuala ramsayi or Fan Palm

The majestic Fan palm definitely belongs among the best Australian native plants. This slow-growing tree could grow to as high as 15 metres. Its gigantic circular leaves have jagged edges, resembling a gargantuan fan. They can also be an excellent indoor plant when grown in containers.

  • Position – Start in heavy shade; can handle full sun when fully grown
  • Soil – Well-drained; fertile soil
  • Watering – Keep well-watered, especially in warmer weather
  • Pruning – Remove spent leaves; prune damaged or worn out fronds
  • Feeding – Fertilise with slow-release complete liquid fertiliser
  • Climate Zone –Temperate, Arid, Semi-arid, Mild Tropical, Tropical

Fan Palm Close up

 

Fan Palm

  1. Citrus australasica or Finger Lime

The finger lime belongs to the Rutaceae family. Its cylindrical fruit is a culinary treat, with the insides looking like caviar with distinct tangy flavour. The tree grows to about 5 metres high, blooms white or pale pink flowers, and the foliage has aromatic oil glands that give off that pleasant citrus scent.

  • Position – Part shade; full sun to bear fruit
  • Soil – Well-drained; fertile soil; loamy
  • Watering – Water regularly; keep the soil moist during warmer weather
  • Pruning – Protect hands with gloves because of the prickly thorns; remove dead wood and clear inside branches; do the heaviest pruning after harvest
  • Feeding – No fertiliser required for maintenance
  • Climate Zone – Cool, Temperate, Arid, Semi-arid, Mild Tropical

Finger Lime CLose up

 

Finger Lime

  1. Gastrolobium brachysema or Brown Butterfly

The brown butterfly deserves its place among the best Australian native plants with its natural bronze dark brown foliage resembling a cluster of the delicate creature from where its common name was derived. The pretty leaves are accented by bright red pea-like flowers that bloom in summer.

  • Position – Full sun to part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; fertile soil; loamy, sandy loam, clay loam
  • Watering – Water regularly until established; requires little water once established
  • Pruning – After a heavy flush of flowers, give a light trim
  • Feeding – Needs less fertiliser than non-legumes
  • Climate Zone – Cool, Temperate, Arid, Semi-arid, Mild Tropical

Gastrolobium brachysema

 

Gastrolobium brachysema – Melburnian

  1. Xanthorrhoea australis or Grass Tree

The slow-growing grass tree earned its place in the list of the best Australian native plants because it is definitely iconic. Its tufted foliage grows out of the blackened trunk, which is not the trunk but leftover leaf bases. Grass trees also provide food and shelter for birds, insects and small mammals.

  • Position – Full sun to light shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; sandy, sandy loam
  • Watering – Do not overwater to prevent root rot; can withstand drought
  • Pruning – To reduce plan stress, cut off flower stalks for the first two seasons; trim off a third to half of the dry or brown foliage to encourage new growth
  • Feeding – Native fertiliser
  • Climate Zone – Cool, Temperate, Arid, Semi-arid, Mild Tropical, Tropical

Grass Tree Close Up

 

Grass Tree

  1. Grevillea Carpet Layer

The Grevillea Carpet layer is a low-growing evergreen that has large, pink fragrant flowers that bloom from autumn through spring. It has long slender leaves, and the flowers are brush-like. The carpet layer quickly establishes and fills large open spades, and is another plant that attracts butterflies and birds.

  • Position – Full sun to light shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; sandy, sandy loam, loam
  • Watering – Require little water once established
  • Pruning – Minimal; prune stem ends if needed
  • Feeding – Low phosphorous
  • Climate Zone – Cool, Temperate, Sub-tropical, Mild Tropical, Mediterranean

Grevillea Carpet Layer Close up

 

Grevillea Carpet Layer – Lwalsh84

  1. Eucalyptus or Gum Tree

The eucalyptus is another popular Australian native plant. This tree is often associated with koalas who feed mainly on its leaves. There are many species of eucalyptus, and gum tree is one of its more popular varieties. These trees are rapid growers, growing to about 30 to 180 feet within the first ten years.

  • Position – Full sun
  • Soil – Well-drained; most kinds of soil
  • Watering – Does not require much water once established; water regularly if grown in containers
  • Pruning – Trim awkward, damaged and unsteady branches to prevent injuries and accidents; trim lower branches after two seasons of growth.
  • Feeding – Not recommended, unless in containers—use slow-release low phosphorous fertiliser
  • Climate Zone – Cool, Temperate, Arid, Semi-arid, Mild Tropical, Tropical

Gum Tree

 

Gum Tree

  1. Doryanthes escelsia or Gymea Lily

Gymea lilies are native perennials with a rosette of large numbers of sword-like foliage. Its deep red flowers bloom from long stems that could reach to up to 6 metres in height. The flowers attract bees and birds in spring.

  • Position – Full sun to part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; chalky, loamy, sandy
  • Watering – Keep well-watered, but could withstand some drought
  • Pruning – Deadhead; remove dead stems and leaves in autumn
  • Feeding – Slow-release low phosphorous fertiliser in spring
  • Climate Zone – Cool, Temperate, Arid, Semi-arid, Mild Tropical, Tropical

Gymea Lily

 

Gymea Lily

  1. Hardenbergia violacea or Heardenbergia Sweetheart

The Hardenbergia sweetheart is a vigorous climber that got its name from its glossy green heart-shaped leaves. This plant is used by a lot as an attractive screen, with its rich deep purple flowers. It is also sometimes used as a ground cover when planted in open areas. 

  • Position – Full sun to part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; loamy, sandy loam, clay loam, potting mix
  • Watering – Requires little water once established
  • Pruning – Prune regularly after flowering to create a compact coverage
  • Feeding – Well-balanced fertiliser
  • Climate Zone – Cool Temperate, Warm temperate, Sub-tropical, Mediterranean

Hardenbergia violacea Close Up

 

Hardenbergia violacea

  1. Brachychiton acerifolius or Illawarra Flame Tree, Flame Bottle Tree, Flame Kurrajong

This Australian native tree grows up to 30 metres and showcases red bell-shaped flowers that bloom in late spring. It earned its name as the flame tree for how eye-catching and bright it looks, as if on fire when its flowers are in full bloom.

  • Position – Full sun 
  • Soil – Moist to dry; loamy or sandy
  • Watering – Keep soil moist; will tolerate drought once established
  • Pruning – Trim awkward, damaged and unsteady branches to prevent injuries and accidents
  • Feeding – Native, slow-release fertiliser in spring for lush new growth
  • Climate Zone – Cool, Temperate, Sub-tropical, Mild Tropical, Mediterranean

Illawarra Flame Tree

 

Illawarra Flame Tree

  1. Themeda australis or Kangaroo Grass

The Kangaroo grass is a tufted native that’s adaptable and very low maintenance, earning the attention of a lot of landscape architects. It is the most widespread among Australian native grasses. In addition to its aesthetic contribution to the landscape, the foliage is also edible when young. 

  • Position – Full sun or part shade
  • Soil – Most soil types; sandy, clay, loamy, sandy loam, clay loam, saline, poor soil
  • Watering – Will tolerate drought once established
  • Pruning – Prune back to encourage new growth
  • Feeding – Not recommended
  • Climate Zone – Temperate, Semi-arid

Themeda Triandra Close Up

 

Themeda Triandra

  1. Anigozanthos x hybrid or Kangaroo Paw ‘Bush Gold’

This medium-sized Kangaroo paw attracts birds with its bright yellow flowers. Perfectly complementing the strappy green foliage are the long-lasting blooms that make beautiful cut flowers. This is one of the best Australian native plants because of its prolific flowering habit, making it a rewarding plant to have in the garden

  • Position – Full sun to part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained; slightly acidic
  • Watering – Medium water needs; require little water once established
  • Pruning – Heavily prune back, about a few centimetres from the ground,  after each successful bloom
  • Feeding – Native, slow-release, low phosphorous fertiliser in spring
  • Climate Zone –Temperate, Sub-tropical, Mild Tropical, Mediterranean, Tropical

Kangaroo Paw Close Up

 

Kangaroo Paw

  1. Leptospermum Aphrodite or Tea Tree

The Leptospermum Aphrodite is a low spreading shrub that grows fast. It blooms in spring, bringing pretty pink flowers that are ideal as cuttings. They are beautiful and hardy, growing densely, which makes them suitable as screens.

  • Position – Full sun to part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained to moderate drainage; moist; Loamy, sandy loam, clay loam, potting mix Watering –Will tolerate drought once established
  • Pruning – Trim as a hedge if used for that purpose once it finishes flowering
  • Feeding – Native, slow-release fertiliser in spring for lush new growth
  • Climate Zone – Cool, Temperate, Sub-tropical, Mild Tropical, Mediterranean

Tea Tree Close Up

 

Tea Tree

  1. Syzygium smithii  or Lilly Pilly

The Lilly Pilly is among the best Australian native plants for more than once reason. In winter, this medium-sized tree grows colourful fruit, popular among the Aborigines, which can be eaten raw or turned into jam. It is also classified as fire-retardant by the SA Country Fire Service. 

  • Position – Full sun to part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained to moderate drainage; moist; clay, loam, sand
  • Watering –Moderate supplementary watering
  • Pruning – Trim as a hedge, windbreak or topiary if used for that purpose, once it finishes flowering
  • Feeding – Native, slow-release fertiliser in spring and autumn
  • Climate Zone – Cool, Temperate, Sub-tropical, Mild Tropical, Mediterranean

Lilly Pilly Hedge with blurred background

  1. Lomandra longifolia or Mat-rush

This native Australian grass is native to most areas except for Western Australia and the Northern Territory. Like most grass, the Mat-rush requires very little maintenance and is an exciting addition to the landscape with its tufted foliage and spiky cream-coloured flowers. The Aboriginal Australians use the long strappy leaves of the mat-rush to make hunting traps, nets, and baskets. 

  • Position – Full sun to part shade
  • Soil – Tolerates most soil types; needs moisture while growing
  • Watering –Tolerant to drought once established
  • Pruning – Prune to the ground regularly to avoid build-up of dead foliage
  • Feeding – Native, slow-release fertiliser after trimming
  • Climate Zone – Cool, Temperate, Sub-tropical, Mild Tropical, Mediterranean

Lomandra Longifolia

 

Lomandra Longifolia

  1. Philotheca myoporoides or Long-leaf Waxflower

The Long-leaf waxflower features scented foliage and dainty flowers that bloom in spring. This adaptable shrub is ideal for borders and hedges. 

  • Position – Full sun to part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained to moderate drainage; moist; sandy, loamy, sandy loam, clay loam, potting mix, poor soil
  • Watering – Requires little water once established
  • Pruning – Trim as a hedge, windbreak or topiary if used for that purpose, once it finishes flowering
  • Feeding – Native, slow-release fertiliser monthly; fertilise sparingly when dormant
  • Climate Zone – Cool, Warm temperate, Cool temperate, Sub-tropical, Mediterranean

Philotheca Myoporoides Close up

 

Philotheca Myoporoides – Forest and Kim Starr

  1. Rhagodia spinescens or Creeping Salt Bush, Spiny Salt Bush

The creeping salt bush got its name for the salty young silvery-blue leaves that are harvested and cooked. Its fruit is also edible and sweet. This bush has intricately arranged and spiny branches that could grow as tall as 3 metres.

  • Position – Full sun to part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained to moderate drainage; moist; saline, sandy, loamy, sandy loam, clay loam, poor soil
  • Watering – Requires little water once established
  • Pruning – Prune to shape or maintenance
  • Feeding –Rarely; Native, slow-release fertiliser 
  • Climate Zone – Cool, Warm temperate, Cool temperate, Sub-tropical, Mediterranean, Tropical

Rhagodia Spinescens

 

Rhagodia Spinescens – Daderot

  1. Scaevola aemula or Fairy Fan Flower

The fairy fan flower is not yet popularly cultivated, but this perennial is very versatile and can be used either as an attractive ground cover or in containers. It has coarse hair on its stems, and softer ones on its fan-shaped flowers that come in purple, mauve or blue. 

  • Position – Full sun to part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained to moderate drainage; moist; acidic
  • Watering – Moderate watering
  • Pruning – Pinch back frequently while young to encourage to bush out; deadhead to encourage more blooms
  • Feeding – High nitrogen, low phosphorous for acid-loving plants; chelated iron mixture if the leaves turn pale
  • Climate Zone – Temperate, Sub-tropical, Mild Tropical, Mediterranean, Tropical

Fairy Fan Flower Close Up

 

Fairy Fan Flower

  1. Eremophila maculata or Spotted Emu Bush, Spotted Fuchsia Bush

The spotted emu bush is one of the best Australian native plants for its beauty and resilience. This low maintenance and drought tolerant plant has spotted and tubular flowers that occur on the leaf axils. There are different varieties of the eremophila maculate, and they could produce flowers in red, pink, mauve, orange or yellow.

  • Position – Full sun is preferred, to part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained to moderate drainage; moist; Clay, loam, sand; alkaline to mildly acidic
  • Watering – Minimal supplementary watering
  • Pruning – Prune annually after flowering in late spring
  • Feeding – Extra phosphorous during the first growing season
  • Climate Zone – Cool, Temperate, Arid, Semi-arid, Mild Tropical, Tropical

Eremophila Maculata Close Up

 

Eremophila Maculata

  1. Poa labillardierei or Common Tussock Grass

The common tussock grass is an excellent choice for low maintenance plants. It is very attractive and highly ornamental without too much work. The Aborigines have used the tufted blue-green or greyish-green foliage of this hardy plant as a source of fibre for making bags, nets, mats and baskets.

  • Position – Full sun is preferred, to part shade
  • Soil – Well-drained to moderate drainage; moist; heavy clay, clay loam, sandy clay loam
  • Watering –Give a half bucket of water after planting; very low maintenance and irrigation once established
  • Pruning – Prune down to one-third of the height in late summer or autumn
  • Feeding – Native, slow-release fertiliser once a year
  • Climate Zone – Cool, Warm temperate, Cool temperate, Sub-tropical, Mediterranean

Poa Labillardierei

 

Poa Labillardierei – Harry Rose

  1. Schefflera actinophylla or Umbrella Tree

The umbrella tree is named as such for its umbrella-like structure near the top. It can grow to as high as 10 metres or more, but it can also be grown indoors. This is easy to care for, just like most Australian native plants. However, it is poisonous to people and animals when ingested, so it is best to keep away from small children and pets.

  • Position – Full sun to full shade
  • Soil – Rich and moist; slightly alkaline to acidic
  • Watering –Regular watering; water when the soil dries
  • Pruning – Regular pruning
  • Feeding – Native, slow-release fertiliser once a year
  • Climate Zone –Warm temperate, Sub-tropical, Mediterranean, Arid, Semi-arid, Mild Tropical, Tropical

Schefflera Actinophylla

 

Schefflera Actinophylla

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